Size Matters ??   You Decide....

                               

                                                

A lil info...

       The Alaskan Klee Kai (AKK) was developed in Alaska by Linda Spurlin and her family to bea companion sized version of the Alaskan Husky. From the early 70's through 1988 the Spurlins carefully selected dogs that met their standards for appearance and soundness. The first AKK to be sold outside of Alaska was in 1988. The AKK was recognized by the American Rare Breed Association (ARBA) in 1995 and by the United Kennel Club (UKC) on January 1, 1997.

  Nicknamed the Alaskan Husky in Miniature, the AKK is a smaller version of its northern ancestors weighing an average of ten to 20 pounds. Despite its husky ancestry this newly developed breed is intended to pull heartstrings instead of sleds. Their smaller size and loyal and somewhat reserved personality make them a unique companion for those seeking a smaller northern breed.

   The most distinctive characteristic of the AKK is the striking facial mask that must be clearly visible due to contrasting colors. The AKK also has prick ears and a well furred tail that curls over the back or to either side when the dog is alert or moving. They can be black & white, or shades of grey & white or red & white. They can be either short haired or long haired. Their eyes can be both blue, both brown, one of each or parti-colored.

  The AKK comes in three sizes. The Toy measures up to 13 inches from the withers to the ground. The Miniature is over 13 inches and up to 15 inches, and the Standard is over 15 inches but not more than 17  1/2  inches. His weight is proportionate to his height.

  The overall appearance of the AKK reflects the breed's northern heritage. He is very curious, active, quick and agile. He is loyal and affectionate with family members, but can be reserved and cautious with strangers and in unfamiliar situations. Obedience training is highly recommended for socialization.

  The AKK has a high energy level and due to its heavy double coat, sheds continuously and "blows" coat twice a year. Therefore an AKK may not be an ideal choice for everyone. However, if in an appropriate home, the AKK can be a wonderful and loving companion. Because of their size, these dogs can live in an apartment, but a home with at least a small, well fenced yard is recommended. They should be exercised regularly, however, they are not as dependent on exercise as their larger relatives. Because of the small litters (usually 1-3 puppies) and the increasing popularity of the AKK, most likely you will be put on a waiting list for a puppy. It might be a long wait, usually depends on your preference of gender, coat and eye color. They are very well worth the wait.

  AKK are very smart, quick to learn, playful and love to please their owners and he will bring you great joy and happiness...

                   

My Personal Observations Of The Akk

Climbing--Oh Yes..I have had a few that could climb a 6 foot chain link fence like they were climbing a ladder..They were very good at it.

Barking-I don't think AKK bark anymore than any other breed but they can surely talk and make you understand what they want..

Digging-No more then the Siberians I use to have...

Shedding-AKK "Blow" their coat twice a year just like their ancesters. Regular brushing cuts down on the shedding. I have also noticed that the "Full Coated" or "Long Haired" coats do not shed as much as the "Shorter" coated dogs.

Doggy Odor- The AKK is a Northern Breed, and Northern Breeds do not have the famous "Doggy Odor".

Grooming- Akk do not require alot of grooming. Since their is no odor, they don't have to be bathed as often  as other breeds. I use baby wipes to clean faces and feet as needed. AKK are very clean lil critters.

Trimming- The only part of a AKK that needs trimming is between the padds of the feet. It must be kept clear of hair to prevent anything from lodging between the pads.

Trainning-AKK are very smart and can be taught anything, just as any other breed... it takes time and patience. They are also known to be very head strong.

Running & Exercise-I think this depends on the dog, I have had some that would rather be outside all of the time and some that are truly house dogs. They all need their exercise, some more than others.

The Weather Channel